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New Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Adult Overweight and Obesity
New Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Adult Overweight and Obesity Synopsis summarizes the key recommendations of the guideline regarding management of overweight and obesity, including referral to comprehensive lifestyle interventions that combine behavioral, dietary, and physical activity change, and additional tools of pharmacologic and procedural interventions.


HFA CONFERENCE NEWS June 29 - July 01, 2021, Virtual
HFA CONFERENCE NEWS June 29 - July 01, 2021, Virtual IV Iron Can Save Costs in HF With Iron Deficiency in Analysis; HF Med Undertreatment Due to Older Age Common, Flouts Evidence; Iron-Clad Benefits of CRT Seen in Reduced-EF Heart Failure; Assays May Guide SGLT2 Inhibitor Use in High CV-Risk Diabetes


Editorial Activity

cardiology book


DIARY OF THE FIRST DAY OF THE FORUM On March 21, the opening ceremony of the International Forum of Cardiology and Internal Medicine was held and the scientific sessions began in four halls of the RussianAcademy of Sciences. An introductory speech and a greeting were made by Academician Oganov R.G. and Professor Mamedov M.N. Traditionally, the Organizing Committee awarded 5 scientists and clinicians with diplomas for their contribution to the development of cardiac science and therapeutic services. Reports were presented at the plenary session by Prof. Kukharchuk V.V. (Moscow) on dyslipidemia, Professor Khalimova Yu.Sh. (St. Petersburg) on the hypoglycemic therapy and the main therapist of Uzbekistan, Professor Kamilova U.K. (Tashkent) on nephroprotection.


HEALTHCARE SPENDING ACCELERATING, 19.7% OF ECONOMY BY 2026
HEALTHCARE SPENDING ACCELERATING, 19.7% OF ECONOMY BY 2026 By 2026, healthcare is projected to make up 19.7% of the US economy, up from 17.9% in 2016, according to a report released today by the Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Spending is projected to be $5.7 trillion by 2026, up from $3.5 trillion now. CMS projects that federal, state, and local governments will be financing 47% of that spending, up from 45% in 2016, partly related to the aging of the population.


Anniversary of the President of the Cardioprogress Foundation,  Academician Rafael G. Oganov (on the occasion of his 80th birthday)
Anniversary of the President of the Cardioprogress Foundation, Academician Rafael G. Oganov (on the occasion of his 80th birthday) On December 9, 2017, the well-known Russian cardiologist, scientist, clinician, doctor of medical sciences, professor, academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, honored scientist of the Russian Federation, laureate of the Russian State Prize, honorary president of the Russian Cardiological Society, editor-in-chief of the 2 leader Russian cardiology journals Oganov Rafael. Rafael Oganov was born in a working family in Moscow. He passed a great life and creative path from a clinical resident to an academician of the RussianAcademy of Medical Sciences, a scientist, a doctor and a teacher widely known in Russia and abroad.


HIGHER COFFEE INTAKE TIED TO LOWER MORTALITY RISK
HIGHER COFFEE INTAKE TIED TO LOWER MORTALITY RISK Higher coffee intake is linked to significantly lower risk for death, two large studies confirm. The benefit was found in diverse European populations, as well as across different racial/ethnic groups, researchers report in articles published online today in Annals of Internal Medicine. Because coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the United States and worldwide, the public health effect of coffee intake could be substantial, even if the effect on an individual is small. Despite mounting evidence for the health and mortality benefits of coffee consumption, the relationship between coffee intake and mortality in different European populations in which coffee preparation methods vary has been unclear. Similarly, data on coffee drinking among nonwhite populations were lacking.


FOCUSED ISSUE ON ADVANCES IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION: INTERVIEW WITH PROF. NATHAN D. WONG AND PROV. IAN GRAHAM
FOCUSED ISSUE ON ADVANCES IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION: INTERVIEW WITH PROF. NATHAN D. WONG AND PROV. IAN GRAHAM A very focused issue on “Advances in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention” has been published in Cardiovascular Diagnosis and Therapy(CDT). It was our honor to invite its Guest-editors Prof. Nathan D. Wong and Prof. Ian Graham for an E-interview. Prof. Nathan Wong is a cardiovascular epidemiologist and Professor and Director, Heart Disease Prevention Program, Division of Cardiology at the University of California, Irvine in California. He holds MPH and PhD degrees in epidemiology from YaleUniversity. He is a past president (2010–2012) of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology. He is also a fellow of the AmericanCollege of Cardiology, American Heart Association, National Lipid Association, and American Society for Preventive Cardiology and is the current treasurer of the Pacific Lipid Association, and is on the board of directors of the InterAmerican Heart Federation and California Chapter of the AmericanCollege of Cardiology. He also serves on the Member Services and Credentialing Committee and Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee of the AmericanCollege of Cardiology and is past chair of the American Heart Association Prevention Science Subcommittee.


INFLAMATION MAY EXPLAIN MORTALITY-RISK LINK TO TV WATCHING
INFLAMATION MAY EXPLAIN MORTALITY-RISK LINK TO TV WATCHING Prolonged television viewing is associated with an increased mortality risk, including from cardiovascular disease (CVD), that may be at least partially mediated by inflammatory markers, suggest results from a large UK cohort study[1]. The findings, which were published online on June 9, 2017 inAtherosclerosis, demonstrate for the first time that over 15% of the association between mortality and increased TV viewing may be explained by C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels. Dr Mark Hamer (National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine, East Midlands, Loughborough, UK) and colleagues note that previous research has shown that prolonged sitting is linked to the expression of genes associated with inflammatory responses. "Fibrinogen, the strongest predictor of mortality in the present study, may also have relevance in terms of elevated risk of vascular conditions, particularly venous thrombosis," they write. "Recent experimental data demonstrated increases in plasma fibrinogen with prolonged uninterrupted sitting that was attenuated with active breaks." While the researchers note that the study design does not allow the temporal relationship between TV viewing and the biomarkers to be determined, previous analyses of the same cohort revealed a prospective association between TV viewing and changes in inflammatory markers.


THE GENDER GAP IN CARDIOLOGY IS EMBARRASSING
THE GENDER GAP IN CARDIOLOGY IS EMBARRASSING Since women make up about half of all medical students, the glaring gender gap in cardiology deserves attention. Dr Robert Harrington of Stanford called the dearth of women in cardiology a talent issue for our field. In a tweet, he noted that women make up 45% to 47% of internal medicine residents but less than 20% of cardiology fellows. And it"s worse in the lab-based subspecialties, where <10% of interventional cardiology or electrophysiology fellows are women.


Professor David Wood, WHF President, on participating in the 70th World Health Assembly
Professor David Wood, WHF President, on participating in the 70th World Health Assembly Today marks the opening of the 70th World Health Assembly (WHA), one of the highlights of the global health calendar. At this annual conference, Ministers of Health, civil society and World Health Organization (WHO) experts will meet to discuss the most pressing health issues of our time, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). As President of the World Heart Federation, I am delighted to welcome a large delegation of member partners, members, Board and staff to the event. Through our leading position in cardiovascular health, we aim to raise the profile of CVD to ensure that global health policies meet the needs of patients and our global membership.